Monday, November 23, 2009

MyWorld Tuesday: Black and White

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The Chilehaus, a Kontorhaus - that's what the office buildings were called in Hamburg and other cities, but Kontorhaeuser are typical for Hamburg

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The Nikolaikirche was destroyed during WWII, the church's spire was widely visible and bomber pilots used to for orientation. After the war, it was decided to keep the tower as a memorial.

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Heinrich Heine - his uncle Salomon Heine owned a bank in Hamburg and Heinrich worked there for some time, but pereferred to write, to his uncle's annoyance. Nevertheless, Salomon gave money to Heinrich throughout his life. Heine's publisher Hoffmann und Campe was and is based in Hamburg.
The first statue, errected in 1926, was destroyed by the Nazis who also burned Heine's books because he was Jewish. The current statue was erected in 1982.
Heine had a sharp tongue and his poetry is often fierce and acrimonious, even the most romatic poems often have a sharp twist to them. I'm always a bit puzzled by the worried look of the statue because it doesn't really fit with the image I have of Heine. But maybe it was modelled after this drawing of Heine, made some time before his death.

Discover the world with MyWorld Tuesday
By the way, is there anything in particular that you would like to see of Hamburg? Let me know and I'll try to make it happen.

15 comments:

Quilt Works said...

I really enjoyed looking at your black and white cityscapes. The historical notes were very interesting too! Thank you for sharing


...Ruby door is the perfect background for...

Marie Höglund said...

I do love your mono shots. B&W are always lovely on buildings. Thanks for sharing :-)

Stephany said...

Wonderful b&w photos! The church spire is gorgeous.

Jack and Joann said...

Good history lesson and good shots. I like the sculpture pic best.

Diane AZ said...

I like your photo of the Heine statue. The sculpture does resemble the drawing you found.

Sylvia K said...

Marvelous, interesting post! Really enjoyed the history! Great black and white shots, very dramatic!

Have a great week!

Sylvia

Janie said...

Interesting buildings, sculpture, and a bit of history. Thanks for sharing this part of your world.

SandyCarlson said...

That was a great read. I love the photos.

koala said...

That first building reminds me of the New York's famous flatiron. Btw I like the b&w approach. Might be the right cure for my seasonal photo block.

J Bar said...

These are brilliant.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Martha Z said...

Great post, I enjoyed the views and text about your world of Hamburg. I enjoyed seeing Bodie through your eyes, too. quite a contrast between the two.

Reader Wil said...

Hi Jennifer! Heinrich Heine was a great author. He deserves a statue!
I am glad that the spire of the Nikolaikirche is still saved. It's beautiful.
Thanks for your visit. You asked if there is a traditional bringer of gifts at X-mas. No, that's Saint Nicolas at 5 December. Black Pieter is also called his "knecht", meaning his servant.
At x-mas we have some presents under the x-mas tree. It's for many people a religious feast for others just a family gathering with lots of food.

eileeninmd said...

Great post on Hamburg. Interesting building and a nice statue.

Postcards from Wildwood said...

Hello Jennifer. Lovely reminders of Hamburg. It's seven years next month since I was last there. I have a friend in Reinbek, and we came to stay with her and her family, and to tour the wonderful Christmas markets. Lucky you with those to look forward to!
Janice.

Dina said...

So sad to think of the church spire being used for bomber navigation.

A statue of Heine! You know, around 1968 I went to the Tel Aviv museum, or maybe it was the library ..., for a cultural evening. All I remember (and forever) is that as a poem of Heinrich Heine was being read and suddenly an older woman in the audience began sobbing. Her reaction was very moving and I think it helped us younger ones to understand better about the "Yekkes," the German Jews who had to flee to Israel, where they were coming from.