Sunday, June 27, 2010

MyWorld Tuesday: Fischbeker Heide

Photobucket
The Fischbeker Heide is a nature reserve in Hamburg and the second biggest heath in Germany (the Lüneburg Heath is the biggest).
Photobucket
We got up at 4am to see the sun rise and to watch birds, but we didn't expect it to be that foggy. It gave the whole landscape a very eerie feeling, especially since it's very similar to what Northern Germany looked like during the last glacial period. I almost expected to see a mammoth stepping out of the mist.
Photobucket
Sunrise, but it would be another hour until it was strong enough for the fog to disappear
Photobucket
We were taking a break for something to eat when we heard a loud noise, like a baying dog that had swallowed a duck lure. It was a fallow deer and I had no idea that they have such a weird voice. It was a doe and I think that she had been scared by something. I don't think it was us, since we were at least 1oo yards away, but she did know we were there and watched us for a while.
Photobucket
The first flowers of the Erica, I plan another visit to this area when it's in full bloom.
Photobucket
Mating butterflies, but I have no idea what species they are.
Photobucket
We left at around 8am, when the sun had fully risen. Other people started to arrive now, but for three hours we had been all alone and I very much enjoyed that. See if you can spot the deer in the photo, by the way (click it for a full view) ;)
Photobucket
Here's a closeup
Photobucket
Photobucket

This is a MyWorld Tuesday post.

Friday, June 25, 2010

Camera Critters: Onager

Photobucket
Hagenbeck (Hamburg's zoo) has two Onager (Equus hemionus) foals this year, they are both about 2 weeks old.

Photobucket
Onager are somewhere between donkeys and horses. They are native to Asia and India, with several subspecies, some have already died out and the others are threatened by habitat destruction.

Photobucket
Hagenbeck got their first Onagers in the 1950s, this was the last expedition to catch wild animals Hagenbeck made (although they did buy wildcaught animals after that). These were the basis for a breeding program and many onagers living in zoos today are their offspring.

Photobucket
Onager can run at a top speed of 70 kmh and can maintain a speed ofg 50kmh for some time. They also have a powerful kick, which is why a Roman siege weapon was named after them. The foal is still getting used to all these legs, though.

Sunday, June 13, 2010

MyWorld Tuesday: Winterhude and Eppendorf

Photobucket
I think what I like best about Hamburg is how green it is and all the water. You can reach a lot of places per boat and here's one, the Ammersbek (built in 1939), one of the Alsterdampfer. They used to be real steam engine ships, but topday there's only one left which will take you from Barmbek to the Jungfernstieg on the weekend. It's a trip I can only recommend!
a view over the canal
Photobucket

Both Winterhude and Eppendorf are a very beauitful parts of Hamburg, with lots of lovely houses and apartments. Maybe one day I'll be rich enough to live there.
Photobucket

here's my favourite building there, the St Johanniskloster. It's was built in 1912 and it used to be a nunnery. Now it's a home for widows and old ladies with a religious background, who don't want to become nuns, but still want to live a live of contemplation and religion. It's called a Damenstift in German and I couldn't find a precise translation, maybe one of you will know?
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket

Photobucket
The St. Johanniskirche was established in 1267, but may be even older. It's one of the oldest parishes in Northern Germany in any case. The age of the church is a bit difficlut to determine, the tower probably used to be a watchtower and was converted into the square tower you see today in 1751, the rest of the church is about 400 years old. It's extremely popular for marriages and is nicknamed the Hochzeitskirche, the wedding church.

Photobucket
The Kellinghusenbad. Built in 1914, it's a public swimming pool and a really gorgeous one. There used to be a register office and a public library in the same building. I bet they had lots of trouble with water damaged books!

Lastly, I found nice examples of two types of building you can find everywhere in Hamburg
Photobucket
The brick building, often from the 20s, and very much part of the townscape of Hamburg. I live in such a building myself and I love it, it looks great and it keeps very cool during the summer. The most famouse brick building is probably the Chilehaus.
Photobucket
And the period building, usually with a brightly painted facade, the apartments huge with high ceilings and often with Art Nouveau elements. This one even has a corner shop, a Tante Emma Laden (Aunt Emma shop), something that's getting rare these days.

Travel the world with MyWorld Tuesday